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Leamington Sunrises and Sunsets

Patrick

Leamington Sunrises and Sunsets

Sightseeing
A Canadian natural treasure. At the southernmost point of the Canadian mainland - Point Pelee National Park, experience nature like never before. Each spring, view flocks of migratory birds, joined in autumn by waves of vivid Monarch butterflies. In winter, wander the trails in solitude and catch the natural ice formations. In summer, bask on sandy beaches. Whether you cycle, paddle, or hike Canada’s second smallest and most ecologically diverse national park, you’ll be immersed in an unforgettable eco-adventure.
Parc national du Canada de la Point-Pelée
1118 Point Pelee Drive
A Canadian natural treasure. At the southernmost point of the Canadian mainland - Point Pelee National Park, experience nature like never before. Each spring, view flocks of migratory birds, joined in autumn by waves of vivid Monarch butterflies. In winter, wander the trails in solitude and catch the natural ice formations. In summer, bask on sandy beaches. Whether you cycle, paddle, or hike Canada’s second smallest and most ecologically diverse national park, you’ll be immersed in an unforgettable eco-adventure.
A beautiful 90-minute ferry ride to the island and a visit to a local winery on the island. From historical sites to shops, nature walks, and night life, Pelee Island provides visitors with a myriad of opportunities. Whether taking a bike ride, going for a swim, browsing through the local shops or indulging in the food and drink that the Island has to offer, Pelee Island can satisfy your desire for calm and quiet or for new sights and sounds. Come and experience all that the Island has to offer! Some establishments and activities on Pelee Island are seasonal. To avoid disappointment, please contact establishments that you would like to visit before May or after October. You may also call the Township of Pelee Municipal Office at 519-724-2931.
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Pelée
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A beautiful 90-minute ferry ride to the island and a visit to a local winery on the island. From historical sites to shops, nature walks, and night life, Pelee Island provides visitors with a myriad of opportunities. Whether taking a bike ride, going for a swim, browsing through the local shops or indulging in the food and drink that the Island has to offer, Pelee Island can satisfy your desire for calm and quiet or for new sights and sounds. Come and experience all that the Island has to offer! Some establishments and activities on Pelee Island are seasonal. To avoid disappointment, please contact establishments that you would like to visit before May or after October. You may also call the Township of Pelee Municipal Office at 519-724-2931.
Beauty on the water...and a great ice cream stand nearby The premier park in the Municipality of Leamington and home to the famous Tomato Splash Pad. Located on the shores of Lake Erie, Seacliff Park boasts over eight hectares of trees, open green space and a lengthy sandy shoreline known as Seacliff Beach. Address: Seacliff Dr W & Forest Ave, Leamington, Ontario, N8H 3X8 Telephone: (519) 322-2337
Sea Cliff
Beauty on the water...and a great ice cream stand nearby The premier park in the Municipality of Leamington and home to the famous Tomato Splash Pad. Located on the shores of Lake Erie, Seacliff Park boasts over eight hectares of trees, open green space and a lengthy sandy shoreline known as Seacliff Beach. Address: Seacliff Dr W & Forest Ave, Leamington, Ontario, N8H 3X8 Telephone: (519) 322-2337
Quaint and filled with interesting things to see and do...Colasanti's Tropical Gardens is an indoor entertainment and shopping centre, situated in the community of Ruthven, part of Kingsville, Ontario. The tropical gardens are housed in 15 temperature-controlled greenhouses and feature exotic birds (Macaw, Cockatoo, Amazon Parrot), home grown tropical plants, a small produce market, domestic and miniature animals, kids rides, an 18-hole mini golf course, home decor shopping, and a restaurant.
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Colasanti's
1550 Road 3 E
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Quaint and filled with interesting things to see and do...Colasanti's Tropical Gardens is an indoor entertainment and shopping centre, situated in the community of Ruthven, part of Kingsville, Ontario. The tropical gardens are housed in 15 temperature-controlled greenhouses and feature exotic birds (Macaw, Cockatoo, Amazon Parrot), home grown tropical plants, a small produce market, domestic and miniature animals, kids rides, an 18-hole mini golf course, home decor shopping, and a restaurant.
With 5 kilometres of trails around this precious marshland habitat, Hillman Marsh draws wildlife and people from both near and far. Adjacent to Lake Erie, the walking trails, nature centre, washrooms and viewing towers at Hillman Marsh can be accessed from the main entrance. Swimming beaches are accessible North Beach parking lot on Mersea Rd. 2 and from South Beach parking lot located on East Beach Road.
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Hillman Marsh Conservation Area
1826 Mersea Rd 2
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With 5 kilometres of trails around this precious marshland habitat, Hillman Marsh draws wildlife and people from both near and far. Adjacent to Lake Erie, the walking trails, nature centre, washrooms and viewing towers at Hillman Marsh can be accessed from the main entrance. Swimming beaches are accessible North Beach parking lot on Mersea Rd. 2 and from South Beach parking lot located on East Beach Road.
Kingsville is Canada’s Southernmost Town. Our climate is warm and our people are even warmer. Take in the simplicity of quiet county roads and lake vistas. Visit roadside stands and markets for homegrown fruit and vegetables. Buy fresh fish at our commercial fishing port on Lake Erie. Enjoy farm-to-table menus, regional pours, and craft beers. Tour our wine country. Shop at fashion boutiques. Browse décor and plants at home and garden centres. Tee off at a championship golf course. Launch your adventures at the marina. Explore our natural areas. Walk, hike, or bike our trails. Visit museums. Slow down to our pace of life. mykingsville.ca
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Kingsville
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Kingsville is Canada’s Southernmost Town. Our climate is warm and our people are even warmer. Take in the simplicity of quiet county roads and lake vistas. Visit roadside stands and markets for homegrown fruit and vegetables. Buy fresh fish at our commercial fishing port on Lake Erie. Enjoy farm-to-table menus, regional pours, and craft beers. Tour our wine country. Shop at fashion boutiques. Browse décor and plants at home and garden centres. Tee off at a championship golf course. Launch your adventures at the marina. Explore our natural areas. Walk, hike, or bike our trails. Visit museums. Slow down to our pace of life. mykingsville.ca
Thiessen Orchards strives to provide a fun filled day for the entire family. We offer Pick Your Own Apples, hay rides in the orchard, and a pumpkin patch to pick your own pumpkins. All ages can burn some energy in the haymow (an old horse barn filled with straw containing 3 slides) or can challenge the 3 acre corn maze. The Kountry Kitchen serves up a delicious menu. Sausage on a Bun, Jumbo Hot Dogs, Fresh Apple Cider (warm or cold), homemade apple pie, caramel apples, apple fritters & muffins to name a few. Enjoy all of these wonderful items in our picnic area. Season begins September 8th. Address: 400 Talbot Rd. E., Leamington, Ontario Telephone: (519) 326-5282 Website
Thiessen Apple Orchard
400 Talbot Road East
Thiessen Orchards strives to provide a fun filled day for the entire family. We offer Pick Your Own Apples, hay rides in the orchard, and a pumpkin patch to pick your own pumpkins. All ages can burn some energy in the haymow (an old horse barn filled with straw containing 3 slides) or can challenge the 3 acre corn maze. The Kountry Kitchen serves up a delicious menu. Sausage on a Bun, Jumbo Hot Dogs, Fresh Apple Cider (warm or cold), homemade apple pie, caramel apples, apple fritters & muffins to name a few. Enjoy all of these wonderful items in our picnic area. Season begins September 8th. Address: 400 Talbot Rd. E., Leamington, Ontario Telephone: (519) 326-5282 Website
Rondeau protects one of the last remaining stands of old growth Carolinian Forest in Ontario. Apart from protecting 3254 of Oak Savannah, Carolinian Forest, Dune habitat, and Coastal wetland, Rondeau is one of North America’s best examples of a Cuspate Sandspit. Formed by the erosion and deposition of sand and gravel, the Rondeau peninsula extends into Lake Erie, and forms a protected bay which is important habitat for a variety of species at risk as well as providing many recreational opportunities. The peninsula, combined with the open bay, attracts migrating birds throughout the spring and fall, resulting in some of the best bird watching in Ontario; beginning with Tundra Swans in March and continuing through May with waves of Warblers, this is truly a birders paradise! Additionally, Rondeau’s provincially rare habitats provide homes to more Species at Risk than any other Provincial Park, including the Five-lined Skink, Prothonotary Warbler, Fowler’s Toad, and Spotted Gar.
Rondeau Park
Rondeau protects one of the last remaining stands of old growth Carolinian Forest in Ontario. Apart from protecting 3254 of Oak Savannah, Carolinian Forest, Dune habitat, and Coastal wetland, Rondeau is one of North America’s best examples of a Cuspate Sandspit. Formed by the erosion and deposition of sand and gravel, the Rondeau peninsula extends into Lake Erie, and forms a protected bay which is important habitat for a variety of species at risk as well as providing many recreational opportunities. The peninsula, combined with the open bay, attracts migrating birds throughout the spring and fall, resulting in some of the best bird watching in Ontario; beginning with Tundra Swans in March and continuing through May with waves of Warblers, this is truly a birders paradise! Additionally, Rondeau’s provincially rare habitats provide homes to more Species at Risk than any other Provincial Park, including the Five-lined Skink, Prothonotary Warbler, Fowler’s Toad, and Spotted Gar.
Jack Miner established his Migratory Bird Sanctuary in 1904; over 110 years later visitors can feed water fowl, hike the woods, visit the Museum, tour the Jack Miner House and enjoy the grounds and special events all year long. Grounds open dawn till dusk, Call for hours, Free admission. Address: 332 Road 3 West., Kingsville, ON Telephone: (519) 733-4034
Jack Miner Migratory Bird
332 Road 3 W
Jack Miner established his Migratory Bird Sanctuary in 1904; over 110 years later visitors can feed water fowl, hike the woods, visit the Museum, tour the Jack Miner House and enjoy the grounds and special events all year long. Grounds open dawn till dusk, Call for hours, Free admission. Address: 332 Road 3 West., Kingsville, ON Telephone: (519) 733-4034
Our mission is to preserve the past of Canada South for the education and interpretation of present and future generations. Sitting on 100 Acres, our 25000 square foot Transportation Museum showcases modes of transportation from early wooden wheel wagons all the way to the present day Viper! Our Heritage Village is a journey back in time to 15 buildings that have been placed here from all over Essex County. Our tour guides would be happy to take you back in time to learn the treasured history of our area. Our Village is open Tuesday Through Sunday May 01 - October 31st, and our Museum is open year round for tours.
Canadian Transportation Museum
Our mission is to preserve the past of Canada South for the education and interpretation of present and future generations. Sitting on 100 Acres, our 25000 square foot Transportation Museum showcases modes of transportation from early wooden wheel wagons all the way to the present day Viper! Our Heritage Village is a journey back in time to 15 buildings that have been placed here from all over Essex County. Our tour guides would be happy to take you back in time to learn the treasured history of our area. Our Village is open Tuesday Through Sunday May 01 - October 31st, and our Museum is open year round for tours.
At present - The museum is not open to the public due to the COVID19 pandemic, to protect our staff and our visitors. The Buxton National Historic Site and Museum is a tribute to the Elgin Settlement, established in 1849 by Rev. William King and an association which included Lord Elgin, then the Governor General of Canada. King, a former slave owner turned abolitionist, purchased 9,000 acres (36 km2) of crown land in Southwestern Ontario and created a haven for fugitive slaves and free Blacks. King brought 15 of his former slaves with him where they could live a free life. The Elgin settlement was divided into 50-acre (200,000 m2) lots. These sold for $2.50/acre, with six percent interest, and could be paid over the course of ten years. For many fugitive slaves, the Buxton settlement was the final stop on the Underground Railroad from the United States. Opened in 1967, the museum complex includes the main building with exhibits about the community and its history, an 1861 schoolhouse, an 1854 log cabin, and a barn. Local historic church cemeteries are adjacent to the museum. The museum is located in North Buxton, Ontario, near South Buxton in Chatham-Kent. Our staff are currently working from their homes and can be reached via email. Stay safe and stay home, so we can welcome visitors sooner than later. "There are signs of industry and thrift and comfort, everywhere; signs of intemperance, of idleness, of want, nowhere. There is no tavern and no groggery; but there is a chapel and a schoolhouse. Most interesting of all are the inhabitants. Twenty years ago, most of them were slaves who owned nothing, not even their children. Now they own themselves; they own homes and farms, and they have their wives and children about them. They are enfranchised citizens of a government which protects their rights. They have the great essentials of human happiness, "something to love, something to do, and something to hope for" and if they are not happy it is their own fault." Written about the Elgin Settlement by Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe (1801-1876) who was appointed by Edwin Stanton of Abraham Lincoln's administration to report on the Freedmen's Inquiry Report. His report became part of the Congressional debate on the Fourteenth Amendment.
Buxton National Historic Site & Museum
At present - The museum is not open to the public due to the COVID19 pandemic, to protect our staff and our visitors. The Buxton National Historic Site and Museum is a tribute to the Elgin Settlement, established in 1849 by Rev. William King and an association which included Lord Elgin, then the Governor General of Canada. King, a former slave owner turned abolitionist, purchased 9,000 acres (36 km2) of crown land in Southwestern Ontario and created a haven for fugitive slaves and free Blacks. King brought 15 of his former slaves with him where they could live a free life. The Elgin settlement was divided into 50-acre (200,000 m2) lots. These sold for $2.50/acre, with six percent interest, and could be paid over the course of ten years. For many fugitive slaves, the Buxton settlement was the final stop on the Underground Railroad from the United States. Opened in 1967, the museum complex includes the main building with exhibits about the community and its history, an 1861 schoolhouse, an 1854 log cabin, and a barn. Local historic church cemeteries are adjacent to the museum. The museum is located in North Buxton, Ontario, near South Buxton in Chatham-Kent. Our staff are currently working from their homes and can be reached via email. Stay safe and stay home, so we can welcome visitors sooner than later. "There are signs of industry and thrift and comfort, everywhere; signs of intemperance, of idleness, of want, nowhere. There is no tavern and no groggery; but there is a chapel and a schoolhouse. Most interesting of all are the inhabitants. Twenty years ago, most of them were slaves who owned nothing, not even their children. Now they own themselves; they own homes and farms, and they have their wives and children about them. They are enfranchised citizens of a government which protects their rights. They have the great essentials of human happiness, "something to love, something to do, and something to hope for" and if they are not happy it is their own fault." Written about the Elgin Settlement by Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe (1801-1876) who was appointed by Edwin Stanton of Abraham Lincoln's administration to report on the Freedmen's Inquiry Report. His report became part of the Congressional debate on the Fourteenth Amendment.
In February 2005, an agreement was reached with the St. Clair Parks Commission and the Government of Ontario to transfer ownership and operation of Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site to the Ontario Heritage Trust. At a bend in the Sydenham River near the town of Dresden stands Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site. The museum – built on the site of the Black settlement that Rev. Josiah Henson helped found in 1841 – preserves the settlement where Henson and his wife Nancy lived. Today, thousands of people make pilgrimages to Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site to discover more about our past. Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site takes its name from Harriet Beecher Stowe's successful 1852 anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, featuring a character named Tom (loosely based on Josiah Henson). Henson's own story is told in his autobiography, first published in 1849. Josiah Henson was born into slavery on June 15, 1789 near Port Tobacco in Charles County, Maryland. As a slave, Henson experienced horrifying conditions. He was separated from his parents, sold twice and maimed for life after being beaten. In 1829, Henson arranged to purchase his freedom with money he earned by preaching to Methodist congregations. Betrayed by his master, Henson was taken to New Orleans to be sold. Henson escaped slavery by fleeing northwards with his wife and four children using the Underground Railroad, eventually crossing the Niagara River into Upper Canada (now Ontario) on October 28, 1830. Upper Canada had become a haven for Black refugees from the United States after 1793 when Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe passed an "An Act to prevent the further introduction of Slaves, and to limit the Term of Contracts for Servitude within this Province." Although the legislation didn't free slaves living in Canada, it prohibited the importation of slaves to the province. This meant that refugees from slavery were free as soon as they set foot in Ontario. By 1830, when Henson arrived, the Black community in Upper Canada consisted of Black Loyalists who had fought for the British during the American Revolution, African American refugees from the War of 1812, and others. Henson started his life in Canada working as a farm labourer and a lay preacher in the Waterloo area. In 1834, he moved to Colchester with 12 friends and established a Black settlement on land rented from the government. There, in 1836, Henson met Hiram Wilson, a missionary from the American Anti-Slavery Society who ministered to Black Canadians. Wilson introduced Henson to one of his friends, James Canning Fuller, a Quaker from New York. With financial assistance from Wilson and a silent partner (probably Fuller), Henson purchased 200 acres in Dawn Township to build a self-sufficient community for fugitives from slavery. The Dawn Settlement, as it was called, centred on the British-American Institute – an all-ages manual school that trained teachers and provided a general education. The school opened in 1842 "to cultivate the entire being, and elicit the fairest and fullest possible development of the physical, intellectual and moral powers," and to provide Black Canadians with the skills they needed to prosper and to disprove the racist beliefs of proponents of slavery who argued that Blacks were incapable of independent living. The Dawn Settlement grew to include mills and a brickyard. Settlers cleared their land and grew crops – mainly wheat, corn and tobacco – and exported locally grown black walnut lumber to Britain and the United States. At its peak, about 500 people lived at the Dawn Settlement. Henson purchased 200 acres of land adjacent to the community, where his family lived (100 of which he sold back to the Settlement at a discounted price). He preached in the Dawn Settlement's community church and served on the executive committee of the Institute. The Dawn Settlement developed administrative problems and in 1849 the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society took over its management. After the school closed in 1868, the Dawn Settlement began to fade. Most residents either returned to the United States where slavery had finally been abolished or moved to other communities in Ontario. Josiah and Nancy Henson, however, continued to live in Dawn for the rest of their lives. Throughout his life, Henson was an important leader for Canada's growing Black community. He led a Black militia unit during the Rebellion of 1837, advocated in support of literacy and education for Blacks, toured parts of the United States and Britain to raise funds to support his activities and helped Black Canadians to join the Union Army to fight against slavery during the American Civil War. Today, plaques from the Ontario Heritage Trust and the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada commemorate the remarkable contributions of this man.
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Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site
29251 Uncle Toms Rd
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In February 2005, an agreement was reached with the St. Clair Parks Commission and the Government of Ontario to transfer ownership and operation of Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site to the Ontario Heritage Trust. At a bend in the Sydenham River near the town of Dresden stands Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site. The museum – built on the site of the Black settlement that Rev. Josiah Henson helped found in 1841 – preserves the settlement where Henson and his wife Nancy lived. Today, thousands of people make pilgrimages to Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site to discover more about our past. Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site takes its name from Harriet Beecher Stowe's successful 1852 anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, featuring a character named Tom (loosely based on Josiah Henson). Henson's own story is told in his autobiography, first published in 1849. Josiah Henson was born into slavery on June 15, 1789 near Port Tobacco in Charles County, Maryland. As a slave, Henson experienced horrifying conditions. He was separated from his parents, sold twice and maimed for life after being beaten. In 1829, Henson arranged to purchase his freedom with money he earned by preaching to Methodist congregations. Betrayed by his master, Henson was taken to New Orleans to be sold. Henson escaped slavery by fleeing northwards with his wife and four children using the Underground Railroad, eventually crossing the Niagara River into Upper Canada (now Ontario) on October 28, 1830. Upper Canada had become a haven for Black refugees from the United States after 1793 when Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe passed an "An Act to prevent the further introduction of Slaves, and to limit the Term of Contracts for Servitude within this Province." Although the legislation didn't free slaves living in Canada, it prohibited the importation of slaves to the province. This meant that refugees from slavery were free as soon as they set foot in Ontario. By 1830, when Henson arrived, the Black community in Upper Canada consisted of Black Loyalists who had fought for the British during the American Revolution, African American refugees from the War of 1812, and others. Henson started his life in Canada working as a farm labourer and a lay preacher in the Waterloo area. In 1834, he moved to Colchester with 12 friends and established a Black settlement on land rented from the government. There, in 1836, Henson met Hiram Wilson, a missionary from the American Anti-Slavery Society who ministered to Black Canadians. Wilson introduced Henson to one of his friends, James Canning Fuller, a Quaker from New York. With financial assistance from Wilson and a silent partner (probably Fuller), Henson purchased 200 acres in Dawn Township to build a self-sufficient community for fugitives from slavery. The Dawn Settlement, as it was called, centred on the British-American Institute – an all-ages manual school that trained teachers and provided a general education. The school opened in 1842 "to cultivate the entire being, and elicit the fairest and fullest possible development of the physical, intellectual and moral powers," and to provide Black Canadians with the skills they needed to prosper and to disprove the racist beliefs of proponents of slavery who argued that Blacks were incapable of independent living. The Dawn Settlement grew to include mills and a brickyard. Settlers cleared their land and grew crops – mainly wheat, corn and tobacco – and exported locally grown black walnut lumber to Britain and the United States. At its peak, about 500 people lived at the Dawn Settlement. Henson purchased 200 acres of land adjacent to the community, where his family lived (100 of which he sold back to the Settlement at a discounted price). He preached in the Dawn Settlement's community church and served on the executive committee of the Institute. The Dawn Settlement developed administrative problems and in 1849 the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society took over its management. After the school closed in 1868, the Dawn Settlement began to fade. Most residents either returned to the United States where slavery had finally been abolished or moved to other communities in Ontario. Josiah and Nancy Henson, however, continued to live in Dawn for the rest of their lives. Throughout his life, Henson was an important leader for Canada's growing Black community. He led a Black militia unit during the Rebellion of 1837, advocated in support of literacy and education for Blacks, toured parts of the United States and Britain to raise funds to support his activities and helped Black Canadians to join the Union Army to fight against slavery during the American Civil War. Today, plaques from the Ontario Heritage Trust and the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada commemorate the remarkable contributions of this man.
Two Creeks Conservation Area is open for dayuse from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. all year, free of charge. Special events, nature trails, washrooms, amphitheatre, group camping, bird watching. Two Creeks Memorial Groves is a memorial forest located at the Two Creeks Conservation Area. The Friends of Two Creeks are volunteers from the community who work in partnership with the LTVCA on the park’s management and facilities development. Located in a wooded creek system, near a major migratory route. Information provided by the Lower Thames Conservation website. Directions: Follow Talbot Trail to Wheatley, take Wheatley Road north. The conservation area is located on the right hand or eastern side of the road just outside of the village limits.
Two Creeks Conservation Area
21638 1 Kent Rd
Two Creeks Conservation Area is open for dayuse from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. all year, free of charge. Special events, nature trails, washrooms, amphitheatre, group camping, bird watching. Two Creeks Memorial Groves is a memorial forest located at the Two Creeks Conservation Area. The Friends of Two Creeks are volunteers from the community who work in partnership with the LTVCA on the park’s management and facilities development. Located in a wooded creek system, near a major migratory route. Information provided by the Lower Thames Conservation website. Directions: Follow Talbot Trail to Wheatley, take Wheatley Road north. The conservation area is located on the right hand or eastern side of the road just outside of the village limits.
Wheatley Provincial Park is Ontario’s “deep south” provincial park – located at the same latitude as Northern California, its trails wind through a southern style Carolinian forest. Many migratory birds pass through and Point Pelee National Park is only 20 minutes away.
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Wheatley Provincial Park
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Wheatley Provincial Park is Ontario’s “deep south” provincial park – located at the same latitude as Northern California, its trails wind through a southern style Carolinian forest. Many migratory birds pass through and Point Pelee National Park is only 20 minutes away.
Food scene
Aleksander Estate Winery is located on the North Shore of Lake Erie, in Southwestern Ontario. Family owned and operated, we use only grapes grown in our own vineyard and region to create wines which are truly unique in character and craftsmanship. We have award winning white, red and fruit wines available. We welcome you to come and visit our tasting room at the vineyard and experience what we have to offer. Who knows, you just might discover your new favourite wine.
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Aleksander Estate Winery
1542 County Road #34
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Aleksander Estate Winery is located on the North Shore of Lake Erie, in Southwestern Ontario. Family owned and operated, we use only grapes grown in our own vineyard and region to create wines which are truly unique in character and craftsmanship. We have award winning white, red and fruit wines available. We welcome you to come and visit our tasting room at the vineyard and experience what we have to offer. Who knows, you just might discover your new favourite wine.
Mastronardi Estate Winery is nestled in the heart of Essex County wine region. This family run winery exhibits a distinguished name in all things agricultural; whether it be their history in the greenhouse fresh produce industry or growing grapes on the 100-acre vineyard. Winemakers – Tony and Jared Mastronardi – a father and son duo work side by side creating award winning VQA wines that will please every palate. Our unique European-style tasting room is open 7 days a week where knowledgeable staff can help you find the perfect wine for any occasion. Mastronardi Estate Winery is home to Vino Vista – A premier multi-functional event centre which hosts events and weddings up to 500 guests all year round. The 100 acre vineyard, originally planted over 25 years ago during the revival of wine production in Southern Ontario, produces 18 varietals of Vinifera. The vines thrive amongst 1000 + acres of vineyards in Southwestern Ontario, located along a peninsula that wraps around the north shore of Lake Erie. The moderating effect of the climate is ensured by the warm waters of Lake Erie, the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair, which surround this peninsula. Mastronardi Estate Winery offers a tasting bar in a European style wine boutique where a knowledgeable Mastronardi team member will assist you with the perfect wine selection for yourself, to bring to a dinner party, or as a gift for someone special.
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Mastronardi Estate Winery
1193 Road 3 E
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Mastronardi Estate Winery is nestled in the heart of Essex County wine region. This family run winery exhibits a distinguished name in all things agricultural; whether it be their history in the greenhouse fresh produce industry or growing grapes on the 100-acre vineyard. Winemakers – Tony and Jared Mastronardi – a father and son duo work side by side creating award winning VQA wines that will please every palate. Our unique European-style tasting room is open 7 days a week where knowledgeable staff can help you find the perfect wine for any occasion. Mastronardi Estate Winery is home to Vino Vista – A premier multi-functional event centre which hosts events and weddings up to 500 guests all year round. The 100 acre vineyard, originally planted over 25 years ago during the revival of wine production in Southern Ontario, produces 18 varietals of Vinifera. The vines thrive amongst 1000 + acres of vineyards in Southwestern Ontario, located along a peninsula that wraps around the north shore of Lake Erie. The moderating effect of the climate is ensured by the warm waters of Lake Erie, the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair, which surround this peninsula. Mastronardi Estate Winery offers a tasting bar in a European style wine boutique where a knowledgeable Mastronardi team member will assist you with the perfect wine selection for yourself, to bring to a dinner party, or as a gift for someone special.
First and foremost, Lee & Maria’s is a family farm - 20 acres. Our long tradition of farming stretches back over 40 years and we stand behind all of the fruits and vegetables we grow. We grow in the traditional style with the aid of synthetic fertilizers and when required we do use some chemicals. We respect our land and strictly follow provincially approved growing practices. We stand behind all of the fruits and vegetables we grow. We understand this isn’t what some of our customers would like to hear. We understand the desire for organic produce. However, we also have a belief that trust with our customers is of the utmost importance and we refuse to grow or sell produce that is called organic when it hasn’t been properly certified. Truth is, a vast majority of farmers who claim to sell organic are not certified and don’t follow proper organic practices. We’d rather be upfront with you than lead you astray. That’s why we have developed our “Farming Definitions” as a set of standards that we promise to follow at all times. When you see us using these words, it isn’t just buzz word lingo…we stand behind it.
Lee and Maria's
692 Seacliff Dr
First and foremost, Lee & Maria’s is a family farm - 20 acres. Our long tradition of farming stretches back over 40 years and we stand behind all of the fruits and vegetables we grow. We grow in the traditional style with the aid of synthetic fertilizers and when required we do use some chemicals. We respect our land and strictly follow provincially approved growing practices. We stand behind all of the fruits and vegetables we grow. We understand this isn’t what some of our customers would like to hear. We understand the desire for organic produce. However, we also have a belief that trust with our customers is of the utmost importance and we refuse to grow or sell produce that is called organic when it hasn’t been properly certified. Truth is, a vast majority of farmers who claim to sell organic are not certified and don’t follow proper organic practices. We’d rather be upfront with you than lead you astray. That’s why we have developed our “Farming Definitions” as a set of standards that we promise to follow at all times. When you see us using these words, it isn’t just buzz word lingo…we stand behind it.
Open until late at night - you will have a wait usually - but not long...this is the perfect place to get an incredible cream in the evening! Family run drive-in restaurant and ice cream place. Proudly serving Essex County since 1954 Open late March til end of October. 7 days/week & all holidays Just east of Cameron Rd on County Rd 34 between Essex and Cottam General Information Specialties include cones, sundaes, banana splits, milkshakes, fresh handmade burgers, home-roasted clubhouses and the famous Boston Cooler Founding Date 1954
Dairy Freez
368 County Road 34
Open until late at night - you will have a wait usually - but not long...this is the perfect place to get an incredible cream in the evening! Family run drive-in restaurant and ice cream place. Proudly serving Essex County since 1954 Open late March til end of October. 7 days/week & all holidays Just east of Cameron Rd on County Rd 34 between Essex and Cottam General Information Specialties include cones, sundaes, banana splits, milkshakes, fresh handmade burgers, home-roasted clubhouses and the famous Boston Cooler Founding Date 1954
Welcome to Sons of Kent Craft Brewing Company, Chatham’s premier craft beer destination. Sons of Kent focuses on producing premium craft beer using traditional methods and modern ingredients. Located in Downtown Chatham, our destination brewery has an on-site tasting room, event space, bottleshop, and live entertainment.
Sons of Kent Brewing Company
27 Adelaide St S
Welcome to Sons of Kent Craft Brewing Company, Chatham’s premier craft beer destination. Sons of Kent focuses on producing premium craft beer using traditional methods and modern ingredients. Located in Downtown Chatham, our destination brewery has an on-site tasting room, event space, bottleshop, and live entertainment.
With over 25+ years of international kitchen experience, Chef BJ Turnbull has owned his own restaurant in the Caribbean, worked on private yachts, and worked in local clubs. BJ is originally from the Windsor Essex area and loves being home with his family. His culinary passion extends to creating memorable and eclectic dishes, wine (and beer) pairing snacks, hosting intimate events, and an bringing you the freshest local ingredients and products in his cooking. Our menu is designed for pairing and sharing. Add some exciting new flavours to your tasting flight or spend an afternoon wining and dining overlooking our lush vineyard. We are happy to offer an experience that will fulfill your CREW’s desires – and appetites – whatever you are looking for. Our retail store is open to walk-ins daily from 11:00 to 6:00. Come browse our selection of wines, CREW Kits, and specialty food items!
CREW - Colchester Ridge Estate Winery
108 Essex County Rd 50
With over 25+ years of international kitchen experience, Chef BJ Turnbull has owned his own restaurant in the Caribbean, worked on private yachts, and worked in local clubs. BJ is originally from the Windsor Essex area and loves being home with his family. His culinary passion extends to creating memorable and eclectic dishes, wine (and beer) pairing snacks, hosting intimate events, and an bringing you the freshest local ingredients and products in his cooking. Our menu is designed for pairing and sharing. Add some exciting new flavours to your tasting flight or spend an afternoon wining and dining overlooking our lush vineyard. We are happy to offer an experience that will fulfill your CREW’s desires – and appetites – whatever you are looking for. Our retail store is open to walk-ins daily from 11:00 to 6:00. Come browse our selection of wines, CREW Kits, and specialty food items!
Known for their perch dinners....nice outdoor seating
10
recommandé par les habitants
Freddy's Restaurant
10
recommandé par les habitants
Known for their perch dinners....nice outdoor seating
Things to do
The 9-hole "Talbot Trail G.C." course at the Talbot Trail Golf Club facility in Wheatley, Ontario features all the hallmarks of Ontario golf. Talbot Trail G.C. golf course opened in 1966. Greg Coulter manages the course as the General Manager.
Talbot Trail Golf Club
790 Talbot Trail
The 9-hole "Talbot Trail G.C." course at the Talbot Trail Golf Club facility in Wheatley, Ontario features all the hallmarks of Ontario golf. Talbot Trail G.C. golf course opened in 1966. Greg Coulter manages the course as the General Manager.
Erie Shores is a beautiful 18-hole course designated as a backyard wildlife habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. Irrigated fairways Expanded & redesigned ponds Irrigated tees & greens Daily specials Clubhouse, patio and pavilion Driving range and outdoor skills center Fully stocked pro shop Perfect for corporate outings and leagues Season passes available Snack shop PGA professional on staff for advice and lessons Entertainment Card accepted Please call to reserve your tee time and to check for course closures.
Erie Shores Golf & Country Club
Erie Shores is a beautiful 18-hole course designated as a backyard wildlife habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. Irrigated fairways Expanded & redesigned ponds Irrigated tees & greens Daily specials Clubhouse, patio and pavilion Driving range and outdoor skills center Fully stocked pro shop Perfect for corporate outings and leagues Season passes available Snack shop PGA professional on staff for advice and lessons Entertainment Card accepted Please call to reserve your tee time and to check for course closures.
Gambling, food and entertainment - please call in advance to see if open during covid restrictions
29
recommandé par les habitants
Caesars Windsor
29
recommandé par les habitants
Gambling, food and entertainment - please call in advance to see if open during covid restrictions
Rent Canoes through the Friends of Point Pelee at the Marsh Boardwalk. Canoe rentals start May long weekend. Please note that there will be no canoe rentals during inclement weather (strong winds, rain storm etc.) RATES: Rental Prices ($20.00 cash or credit card required as deposit) 1 Hour: $ 20.00 (1 hr.minimum ) $10.00 for each hour after 3 people maximum per canoe Prices include: Life jackets per person, 2 paddles and marine safety kit * Unreturned or damaged equipment $50 fee
Friends of Point Pelee
1118 Point Pelee Drive
Rent Canoes through the Friends of Point Pelee at the Marsh Boardwalk. Canoe rentals start May long weekend. Please note that there will be no canoe rentals during inclement weather (strong winds, rain storm etc.) RATES: Rental Prices ($20.00 cash or credit card required as deposit) 1 Hour: $ 20.00 (1 hr.minimum ) $10.00 for each hour after 3 people maximum per canoe Prices include: Life jackets per person, 2 paddles and marine safety kit * Unreturned or damaged equipment $50 fee
Canada's Nature Store Our unique Lake Erie waterfront location is just minutes from famous Point Pelee National Park in Leamington Ontario on the southern tip of Canada. Pelee Wings is a must see and visit for birders and naturalists, kayakers and canoeists, and everyone who enjoys nature as a part of their lifestyle. Stop in to browse an eclectic mix of everything to enjoy our natural world - from birding & wildlife books & nature art, jewelry & stationery, bird feeders & outdoor clothing, the largest selection of binoculars in Canada & 50+ models of spotting scopes and telescopes, to 100's of kayaks & canoes, and paddling gear. If you don't see something here for yourself, you're sure to find a unique item for that special family member or friend.
8
recommandé par les habitants
Pelee Wings Nature Store & Paddlesports Shop
636 Point Pelee Dr
8
recommandé par les habitants
Canada's Nature Store Our unique Lake Erie waterfront location is just minutes from famous Point Pelee National Park in Leamington Ontario on the southern tip of Canada. Pelee Wings is a must see and visit for birders and naturalists, kayakers and canoeists, and everyone who enjoys nature as a part of their lifestyle. Stop in to browse an eclectic mix of everything to enjoy our natural world - from birding & wildlife books & nature art, jewelry & stationery, bird feeders & outdoor clothing, the largest selection of binoculars in Canada & 50+ models of spotting scopes and telescopes, to 100's of kayaks & canoes, and paddling gear. If you don't see something here for yourself, you're sure to find a unique item for that special family member or friend.
Oxley Estate Winery is nestled on 38 acres in the heart of the Lake Erie North Shore wine route, in Harrow, Ontario, Canada. Our vineyards are blessed with long, sunny days, light lake breezes, and rich sandy loam soil over a limestone ridge about 30 feet down.
27
recommandé par les habitants
Oxley Estate Winery
533 County Road 50 East
27
recommandé par les habitants
Oxley Estate Winery is nestled on 38 acres in the heart of the Lake Erie North Shore wine route, in Harrow, Ontario, Canada. Our vineyards are blessed with long, sunny days, light lake breezes, and rich sandy loam soil over a limestone ridge about 30 feet down.
Riverside Drive West to East (from Huron Church Road to Lincoln Road) Open year round From the base of the Ambassador Bridge, this paved trail extends east for 5 km along the riverfront parkland to Hiram Walker distillery in historic Walkerville. Enjoy scenic views of the Detroit River extending from Ambassador Park to Centennial Park into Dieppe Gardens, along Festival Plaza to the Bert Weeks Memorial Garden and Clifford and Joan Hatch Wildflower Garden. Odette Sculpture Park, an outdoor art gallery, is open year round, featuring large scale contemporary sculptures. Dieppe Gardens, a downtown park, honours veterans of foreign wars with distinctive monuments. Bert Weeks Memorial Garden features an elaborate fountain and reflecting pool (open seasonally) Clifford and Joan Hatch Wildflower Garden is a naturalized garden featuring local flowers.With two paths: one for cyclists/rollerbladers and a riverfront promenade for strollers and walkers, everyone can enjoy this fantastic trail! Address: Riverfront Trail, Windsor, Ontario
Windsor riverfront
Riverside Drive West to East (from Huron Church Road to Lincoln Road) Open year round From the base of the Ambassador Bridge, this paved trail extends east for 5 km along the riverfront parkland to Hiram Walker distillery in historic Walkerville. Enjoy scenic views of the Detroit River extending from Ambassador Park to Centennial Park into Dieppe Gardens, along Festival Plaza to the Bert Weeks Memorial Garden and Clifford and Joan Hatch Wildflower Garden. Odette Sculpture Park, an outdoor art gallery, is open year round, featuring large scale contemporary sculptures. Dieppe Gardens, a downtown park, honours veterans of foreign wars with distinctive monuments. Bert Weeks Memorial Garden features an elaborate fountain and reflecting pool (open seasonally) Clifford and Joan Hatch Wildflower Garden is a naturalized garden featuring local flowers.With two paths: one for cyclists/rollerbladers and a riverfront promenade for strollers and walkers, everyone can enjoy this fantastic trail! Address: Riverfront Trail, Windsor, Ontario
Take a hike along one of the most beautiful forest boardwalk trails in the region. While exploring this 19 hectare Carolinian woodland, you’ll see Tulip-tree, Sassafras, Black Gum, Sycamore and Flowering Dogwood trees, as well as wildflowers such as Trillium, Jack-in-the-pulpit, May Apple, Spring Beauty and Columbine, to mention just a few. Kopegaron Woods Conservation Area is renowned for its spring wildflowers, and is a great place for photographers to hone their skills in the brilliant sea of colour that lines the trails. Boardwalk trails meander through this conservation area, and beautiful spring warblers can be often be spotted resting before continuing their flight north in spring.
Kopegaron Woods Conservation Area
Take a hike along one of the most beautiful forest boardwalk trails in the region. While exploring this 19 hectare Carolinian woodland, you’ll see Tulip-tree, Sassafras, Black Gum, Sycamore and Flowering Dogwood trees, as well as wildflowers such as Trillium, Jack-in-the-pulpit, May Apple, Spring Beauty and Columbine, to mention just a few. Kopegaron Woods Conservation Area is renowned for its spring wildflowers, and is a great place for photographers to hone their skills in the brilliant sea of colour that lines the trails. Boardwalk trails meander through this conservation area, and beautiful spring warblers can be often be spotted resting before continuing their flight north in spring.